Samsung releases a video to help you find burn-in marks in your OLED TV, suggests a switch to QLED

Samsung released a short video that may help you find burn-in marks in your OLED TV. The video should be run on your OLED TV, and it shows a red image that will (according to Samsung) show visible marks if there are any issues in your TV.

If you did find such marks - Samsung suggested to contact a service center - or switch to one of its QLED LCDs... I wonder if this is a mart marketing move as Samsung itself is now committed to OLED TV technology and will start producing QD-OLEDs in 2021. Samsung is probably hoping that no one will remember this video by then...

LG ordered to compensate two Australian consumers due to OLED TV burn-in

A Federal Court in Australia ordered LG Electronics to pay a fine of $160,000 AUD to two consumers after LG refused to repair, replace or refund OLED TVs that exhibited burn in after less than a year of use.

LG OLED C9 photo

Under the Australian law, consumers who purchased faulty products are entitled to a repair, refund or replacement - even if the warranty does not apply or has come to an end. The two OLED TVs were bought in 2013.

HDTVTest: OLED TV burn-in is highly unlikely if you vary your content

OLED Displays burn-in has always been an interesting topic, with some users and reviewers complaining about serious burn-in issues in some of their OLED TVs, while others report of no visible issues. UK based HDTVTest performed a comprehensive 6-month test on a brand new LG E8 OLED TV and found no sign of permanent burn-in.

HDTVTest says that they displayed varying content for 20 hours a day for more than 6 months (a total of over 3,700 hours). They also suggest to put the TV in standby mode rather than complete power-off so that the compensation cycles can run.

Reports from Korea suggest that Samsung still faces technology challenges before it can begin producing QD-OLED TVs

Samsung is developing its QD-OLED TV technology and the company was supposed to hold an investment review committee on April 2019 to decide whether to go ahead with plans to start production soon (mass production by the end of 2020).

QD-OLED stack scheme (DSCC, Oct-2018)

However in May we later reported that Samsung decided to delay the production - trial production will begin towards the end of 2020, with real mass production on a new 10-Gen line only at around 2023. A new report from Korea sheds some more light on Samsung's situation.

Asus demonstrates an OLED gaming laptop, still has concerns over lifetime and burn-in

Asus recently launched a new gaming laptop, the Zephyrus S GX502, which uses a 15.6" 4K 120Hz LCD IPS display. At Computex 2019 in Taiwan, Asus demonstrated one of these laptops with an 15.6" SDC AMOLED display.

Asus Zephyrus S GX502 OLED gaming laptop prototype photoAsus OLED laptop (left) vs LCD one (right)

Asus says it has no immediate plans to release an OLED gaming laptop as it still has concerns over the shorter lifespan of OLED displays, image retention (burn-in) and long-term color accuracy. As soon as these concerns are resolved, Asus says it will push forward with incorporating OLED panels in gaming laptops.

IGNIS demonstrates how its compensation technology can remove burn-in signs from automotive AMOLED panels

IGNIS Innovation published the following interesting video that shows how its compensation technology can remove the visible signs of pixel aging:

IGNIS tells us that this is a 12" LTPS automotive AMOLED panel. The company tested it for 1,000 hours at 85 degrees Celsius - to make sure the company's compensation technology can remove all signs of burn-in patterns. IGNIS's Max Life technology combines a functional in-pixel compensation pixel circuit with a sensing line and the company's current measurement driver chip that can perform external compensation.

Nanosys expects to show working emissive QD-LED displays by the end of 2019

HDTVTest posted an interesting interview with Cadmium-Free QD developer Nanosys CEO and president Jason Hartlove. In this long interview Jason discusses the company's technology and recent achievements.

Jason reveals that the company is working on emissive Quantum Dots displays - and he expects to have a full-color monitor-size QLED display prototype ready by the end of 2019. Jason says that they hope to show these display prototypes in private demos at CES 2020.

Rtings.com tests show serious burn-in in LG's OLED TVs after only 4,000 hours of use

Review web site Rtings.com has performed an extensive burn-in trial for LG's 2017 OLEDC7 OLED TV models, and reports that the TVs have shown signs of permanent image-retention, or burn-in after only 4,000 hours.

Rtings have used six OLED TVs, running them from January 2018 for 5 hours each day at a time followed by one hour when the TVs are turned off. This cycle was run 4 times a day. One TV was at maximum brightness, and the rest at only 200 nits. Some played CNN, some a gaming title (FIFA 2018) and some of the TVs played regular TV channels. The TV that played CNN had a clear logo and static bar burn-in images, and the same goes for the FIFA game (but only slightly). The regular TV programs did not suffer from any burn-in.

LG replaces the OLED TV at Incheon airport to an LCD due to burn-in issues

Only four months after LG installed 69 OLED TVs at Seoul's Incheon Airport it was reported that the TVs suffer serious permanent image-retention, or burn-in. ZDNet now reports that LG replaced the problematic OLED TVs at the airport's Korean Air Miler Club Lounge with LCDs.

LG OLED TV at Incheon airport - burn-in photo

The report suggests that LG was not sure it could solve the burn-in issues with this particular display, and so opted for an LCD. LG denies that burn-in is a serious issues and says the TVs's lifetime are over 30,000 hours.

ZDNet: LG's OLED TVs at Incheon airport suffer from serious burn-in

According to a ZDNet report, the LG OLED TVs at Incheon Airport, installed only a few months ago, suffer from serious permanent image-retention, or burn-in. You can see the artifact at the top part of the TV in the photo below:

LG OLED TV at Incheon airport - burn-in photo

According to ZDNet, LG installed 29 such OLED TVs at the airport lobby in addition to 40 more units at four of the airport's lounges. These were installed in January 2018, only four months ago. LG Electronics did not comment on this story.