Meet us next month at OLED Korea 2019!

OLED Korea is an international conference, focused on OLED technologies, organized by UBI Research. The OLED-Info team will attend this year's event, which will take place next month in Seoul, Korea (March 6-7).

OLED Korea 2019 banner (February 2019)

We're looking for an exciting event - and are happy to schedule meetings - so if you plan to attend OLED Korea 2019, do contact us!

LetinAR adopts the Fraunhofer's FEP low-power OLED microdisplays in its new pinhole effect PinMR AR technology

The Fraunhofer FEP institute has teamed up with Korean-based LetinAR to develop an ultra-low-power OLED microdisplay based optic lens for AR applications. The Fraunhofer and LetinAR will present the new technology at MWC 2019.

LetinAR & the Fraunhofer Institute - OLED microdisplay and optic photo

LetinAR's PinMR technology uses the Pinhole Effect with tiny mirrors and embedded them with eyeglass lenses. The PinMR mirrors reflect the light generated by a microdisplay and guide it into the user's pupils. Users may view the virtual image created via microdisplay equipped with magnifying see-through optics as well as the image from the real world at ease. Human eyes cannot detect the mirrors, which are smaller than pupils. Only the virtual image formed by the light reflected by those mirrors is visible.

The NSF awards Molecular Glasses with $225,000 to develop non-crystallizable TADF host materials

US-based OLED material developer Molecular Glasses received a $225,000 SBIR Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation to develop non-crystallizable charge transporting organic materials as OLED functional layers and thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter-layer hosts.

Molecular Glasses OLEDIQ advantages chartThe NSF explains currently used OLED host molecules tend to crystallize and are poor solvents for the emitting molecules leading to decreased light emission efficiency and shortened device lifetime. Molecular Glasses' innovation uses isomeric mixtures of designed molecules that are amorphous and non-crystallizable in all three layers.

IHS: LG's 65" rollable OLED TV costs over $3,000 to produce

At CES 2019, LG Electronics announced its first rollable TV (and the world's first rollable OLED device), the 65" Signature OLED TV R. Market analysts from IHS estimate that producing each 65" rollable OLED TV will cost over $3,000 - more than three times the cost of production of LG's regular 65" OLED TV panels.

LG's new TV can roll up into its base, and has three viewing options - full view, line view and zero view. In Line View, there are six different modes, in which the TV can show the weather, the time, a home dashboard and more. Like the rest of LG's 2019 OLED range, the OLED TV R is based on the company's 2nd-gen Alpha 9 intelligent processor the enables LG's ThinQ AI to offer new display algorithms and Amazon's Alexa and Google's Assistant.

LG launches its 55" transparent touch-enabled OLED signage solutions

Last week the Integrated Systems Europe (ISE) event took place, and LG Electronics demonstrated its latest OLED and LED signage solutions. LG also used the event to launch its 55" transparent touch-enabled OLED displays:

LG has been demonstrating 55" transparent OLED displays for many years, and the latest prototype shown at CES 2019 featured a transparency of 40%. We can assume that these new commercial displays feature the same transparency. It is not clear yet when these displays will start shipping - and what will be the price.

USC researchers develop copper-based OLED emitters that could pave the way to an efficient long-lasting blue OLED

Researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) led by Mark E. Thompson (who was the first to report on efficient phosphorescent OLEDs, later commercialized at UDC) developed a new copper-based phosphorescent OLED emitter compound, that could have several advantages to the currently-used iridium compounds.

USC rigid copper OLED emitter compound photo

The researchers say that copper-based emitters could be cheaper (as iridium is an expensive and rare element) - but more importantly could be the key to develop an efficient and long-lasting blue OLED emitter.

DSCC: the production costs of a 55" QD OLED TV will reach almost $800 in 2019, will fall to $450 by 2022

DSCC says that production costs for a 55" QD-OLED TV panel at Samsung Display's 8.5-Gen fab will reach almost $800 in 2019. While this will fall to around $450 in 2022, Samsung will still lose money on every panel sold if DSCC has its price and cost estimates right.

QD-OLED production cost estimates (2019-2022, DSCC)

It is important to note that most of the cost is depreciation costs - which means that in terms of cash on each panel, SDC's margins will actually be around 40%. Part of the reason for he high cost of required equipment is the need to use 12 TFT masks.. SDC is apparently looking to reduce the mask number which will lower production costs.

Kyulux - Hyperfluoresence OLED emittersKyulux - Hyperfluoresence OLED emitters